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Animal Languages in the Middle Ages


Animal Languages in the Middle Ages

Representations of Interspecies Communication
The New Middle Ages

von: Alison Langdon

95,19 €

Verlag: Palgrave Macmillan
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 13.02.2018
ISBN/EAN: 9783319718972
Sprache: englisch

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Beschreibungen

The essays in this interdisciplinary volume explore language, broadly construed, as part of the continued interrogation of the boundaries of human and nonhuman animals in the Middle Ages. Uniting a diverse set of emerging and established scholars, Animal Languages questions the assumed medieval distinction between humans and other animals. The chapters point to the wealth of  non-human communicative and discursive forms through which animals function both as vehicles for human meaning and as agents of their own, demonstrating the significance of human and non-human interaction in medieval texts, particularly for engaging with the Other. The book ultimately considers the ramifications of deconstructing the medieval anthropocentric view of language for the broader question of human singularity.
1 IntroductionPart I Communicating Through Animals2 Becoming-Birds: The Destabilizing Use of Gendered Animal Imagery in Ancrene Wisse3 As faucon comen out of muwe”: Female Agency and the Language of Falconry4 Saints and Holy Beasts: Pious Animals in Early-Medieval Insular Saints’ Vitae5 The Speech of Strangers: The Tale of the Andalusi PhoenixPart II Recovering Animal Languages6 Bark Like a Man: Performance, Identity, and Boundary in Old English Animal  Voice Catalogues7 In Briddes Wise: Chaucer’s Avian Poetics8 Understanding Hawk-Latin: Animal Language and Universal Rhetoric9 "Dites le mei, si ferez bien": Fallen Language and Animal Communication in Marie de France's BisclavretPart III Embodied Language and Interspecies Dependence10 On Equine Language: Jordanus Rufus and Thirteenth-Century Communicative Horsemanship11 No Hoof, No Horse: Hoof Care, Veterinary Medicine and Cross-Species Communication in Late Medieval England12 Medieval Dog Whisperers: The Poetics of Rehabilitation13 Embodied Emotion as Animal Language in Le Chevalier au Lion.
Alison Langdon is Associate Professor of English at Western Kentucky University, USA. She is the editor of Postscript to the Middle Ages: Teaching Medieval Studies through Umberto Eco’s The Name of the Rose (2009) and has published articles on the women troubadours, Chaucer and his contemporaries, and canines in medieval literature. Her current projects center on the liminality of human/animal identity in the medieval imagination.  
 The essays in this interdisciplinary volume explore language, broadly construed, as part of the continued interrogation of the boundaries of human and nonhuman animals in the Middle Ages. Uniting a diverse set of emerging and established scholars, Animal Languages questions the assumed medieval distinction between humans and other animals. The chapters point to the wealth of  non-human communicative and discursive forms through which animals function both as vehicles for human meaning and as agents of their own, demonstrating the significance of human and non-human interaction in medieval texts, particularly for engaging with the Other. The book ultimately considers the ramifications of deconstructing the medieval anthropocentric view of language for the broader question of human singularity. 
Challenges rather than reinforces the human-animal divide, setting itself apart from previous full-length studies on this topicAcknowledges the various modes of meaning through which human and nonhuman animals communicated between and among themselves in the Middle AgesIncludes a breadth of discussions that range from falconry and horsemanship, as well as imaginative literature and medieval anthropocentrism
“This diverse and useful collection of essays takes us deeper into the critical animal turn of medieval literature by addressing compelling cases of verbal and bodily languages in nonhumans. Most imperatively, the book at points bravely pursues a broader acknowledgment of animal utterance as it contests the now outmoded human ownership of language.” (Lesley Kordecki, Professor of English at DePaul University, USA) “Animal Languages in the Middle Ages now arrives in timely fashion to remind us that…the Middle Ages already witnessed a similar outpouring of interest in animal semiotics. Surveying saints’ lives and hawking manuals, verse romances and veterinary treatises, this volume demonstrates that medieval attitudes toward animal consciousness were more complex, more nuanced, and in some ways more accurate than the modern animal science that has supplanted them.” (Bruce Boehrer, Bertram H. Davis Professor of English, Florida State University, USA)  “Animal Languages in the Middle Ages attends to gesture, to avian Latins, to the attentiveness required to train falcons and horses, and even to lions as emotional therapists. With cases that span the Middle Ages, ranging from Persia to Iberia, in a host of languages, human and otherwise, this collection’s on-the-ground picture of the shared worlds of humans and nonhumans utterly demolishes the false belief that medieval people, as a whole, thought of animals only as nonlinguistic, passive tools.” (Karl Steel, Associate Professor, Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center, CUNY, USA) “Assembling established and emergent voices in the field of medieval literary and cultural studies, Animal Languages offers a vivid exploration of interspecies codependence across a range of disciplinary perspectives. Rather than approaching nonhuman animals as mere topics of discourse or tropes in medieval thought, this textured collection richly explores modes of communication beyond human speech or writing—including the body language of horse hooves, otter breath, canine faces, and modalities of touch, smell, gesture, and motion. Animal Languages is paradigm-shifting in its linguistic, cultural, and textual range, addressing Latin, Old English, Anglo-Norman, early and late Middle English, Old French, and Arabic and Persian literary traditions.” (Jonathan Hsy, Associate Professor of English at George Washington University, author of Trading Tongues: Merchants, Multilingualism, and Medieval Literature)

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